Your browser is not supported. Please upgrade to a modern browser in order to use all the features of the UKHC web application: Firefox | Chrome | Microsoft Edge
Skip to main content
close menu
close menu

Search UK HealthCare

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) about COVID-19 for cancer patients

covid-19

As leaders at UK Markey Cancer Center closely monitor this public health crisis along with UK HealthCare leadership, we would like to provide some guidance to our cancer patients and answer frequently asked questions regarding COVID-19.

For more general information and resources regarding COVID-19, visit the UK HealthCare COVID-19 website.

Should I keep my appointment at the Markey Cancer Center?

If you have symptoms of a COVID-19 infection or were exposed to someone infected with the virus, you should call your physician’s office before coming to the Markey Cancer Center. The health care team will assist you in determining the next steps.

If you do not have symptoms, keep your scheduled appointment. The Markey Cancer Center is beginning to use telehealth for patient appointments. Your provider may contact you to discuss a telehealth visit or reschedule a non-essential appointment to a time when the risk of COVID-19 infection is lower.

If I have cancer, what can I do to protect myself from COVID-19?

The best protection from a viral infection is prevention. Avoid close contact with others, particularly if you have other serious or chronic medical conditions. Keep your hands clean and avoid touching your face. Frequently clean and disinfect touched surfaces like countertops, tables, doorknobs, light switches, phones, desks, keyboards, faucets, toilets, and sinks. Do not travel unless necessary.

For more information and resources around good practices during this time, visit the UK HealthCare COVID-19 website.

How is the Markey Cancer Center screening for COVID-19?

We screen all patients and visitors. There are central screening areas in the lobbies of the Roach and the Whitney Hendrickson Buildings. We also screen patients and visitors at the check-in desk for each clinic. Screening means asking questions to identify anyone 1) exposed to COVID-19, or 2) with upper respiratory symptoms, including fever AND cough or shortness of breath.

Are there any restrictions that may affect my family or friends during my visit to the Markey Cancer Center?

Yes. To help limit risk to you and our patients, we are limiting family and friends who can accompany you on your visit. NO visitors are allowed in the Outpatient Chemotherapy and Infusion areas or the Bone Marrow Transplant Clinic (First floor, Roach building). The remaining clinics permit up to one (1) visitor, though we prefer no visitors, if possible. Family members and visitors are encouraged to wait in their car rather than the waiting rooms. 

Visit UK HealthCare's full COVID-19 visitation policy webpage for more information.

Can I still get my chemotherapy if I am feeling well?

At this time, there is no evidence to support changing or withholding chemotherapy or immunotherapy in patients with cancer. The balance of potential harms from delaying therapy versus the potential benefits from possibly preventing a COVID-19 infection is very uncertain. There is no evidence to suggest that people with cancer are more likely to get a COVID-19 infection compared to the general population. A preliminary report indicates that patients with cancer may have a higher incidence of severe events compared to other people infected with COVID-19. At this time, oncologists continue to treat cancer patients with chemotherapy as long as they are feeling well with no symptoms of an active infection. The decision to treat cancer with chemotherapy is an important one and should be made only after consultation with your oncologist.

Will I be able to have my cancer operation?

As recommended by the CDC and the American College of Surgeons, elective surgeries are being postponed across the country to save essential resources like personal protective equipment, intensive care beds, and ventilators. In most cases, cancer surgery is not elective and will continue as planned. If your cancer is very slow-growing and a temporary delay in the operation will not affect your health, your surgeon may elect to postpone your procedure for a short time.