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Become a Patient

Here's how to get started with UK HealthCare.

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic UK HealthCare primary and specialty clinics are transitioning, when appropriate, from in-person visits to TeleCare visits. If you are still interested in making an appointment, please fill out and submit our secure form. You will be contacted within 24 hours Mon.– Fri. to set up a TeleCare appointment. If you have an urgent care need, we are also offering UK Urgent Telecare

After your first visit, a follow-up appointment will be scheduled to establish your regular care with our physicians.

Set up an appointment

  • Find a doctor or provider for your specific need.
  • Call 859-257-1000 or 800-333-8874 (toll free) 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday. UK HealthCare operators will connect to the clinic so you can make the appointment and will help with any questions.

Request an Appointment Online

What to bring to your first appointment

  • Your insurance card and forms
  • Medical records (including immunization records)
  • Any medications you are currently taking. 
  • If you are scheduled to have lab work or testing done before your appointment, read about our clinical lab service.

Maps and directions

Find out more about our facilities.

When to arrive

Please arrive a half hour early for your appointment so you will have time to register.

Where to go after you arrive

Go to the registration desk located at Kentucky Clinic on the first or third floor, or in the main hospital lobby.

About our services

If you will be admitted to the hospital, find out about our services and helpful information for visitors.

  • Why Choose UK HealthCare?

    UK HealthCare is the hospitals and clinics of the University of Kentucky. But it is so much more. It is 9,000 people – physicians, nurses, pharmacists and other healthcare professionals – all dedicated to providing the most advanced, most effective care available.

    It is physicians and other medical professionals trained in the most effective techniques so that no Kentuckian, no matter how sick they are or how rare their illness, needs to go far from home for the treatment they need.

    It is a Level 1 trauma center, ready every minute of every day to treat even the most serious injuries. And a Level IV Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, caring for the tiniest and sickest newborns – giving them a chance not just to live, but to live productive, happy lives.

    It is the UK Markey Cancer Center, which has earned designation by the National Cancer Institute – the most prestigious designation possible. Because of that, we have access to new treatments not yet generally available, and to clinical trials most other hospitals do not.

    It is nurses providing care for every patient, every time. Their work has earned Magnet status, the highest recognition in the nursing field.

    It is educators in our six health professions colleges teaching the next generation of doctors, nurses and other healthcare professionals, launching the highest standards of care into the future.

    It is researchers working to discover treatments and cures not yet even imagined.

    And it is a network of partnerships and outreach locations throughout Kentucky, so that world-class care is always close to home.

  • How to Get a Second Opinion

    Because of the increase in medical knowledge and new treatments, it is difficult for any one physician to be aware of all the latest information. Sometimes a patients and their physicians together are seeking second opinions so better and more informed decisions can be made.

  • About Clinical Trials

    Researchers are working hard to identify new treatments and strategies to improve health and to understand the diseases that make us sick, but in order to succeed they need both healthy research participants and participants with medical conditions. Often, studies end because they don't have enough participants, leaving important questions unanswered. 

    You can make a difference by participating in research.