Your browser is not supported. Please upgrade to a modern browser in order to use all the features of the UKHC web application: Firefox | Chrome | Microsoft Edge
Skip to main content
close menu
close menu

Search UK HealthCare

Stool analysis

A stool analysis is a series of tests done on a sample of stool (feces). It can find problems with the digestive tract. These health problems can include infection, poor nutrient absorption, or cancer.

  • Preparing for the test

    How do you prepare for a stool analysis?

    Many medicines can change the results of this test. You will need to avoid certain medicines depending on which kind of stool analysis you have. You may need to stop taking medicines such as antacids, antidiarrheal medicines, antiparasite medicines, antibiotics, laxatives, or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for 1 to 2 weeks before you have the test. Be sure to tell your doctor about all the nonprescription and prescription medicines you take.

    Be sure to tell your doctor if you have:

    • Recently had an X-ray test using barium contrast material, such as a barium enema or upper gastrointestinal series (barium swallow). Barium can interfere with test results.
    • Traveled in recent weeks or months, especially if you have traveled outside the country. This helps your doctor look for the parasites, fungi, viruses, or bacteria that may be causing a problem.

    If your stool is being tested for blood, you may need to avoid certain foods for 2 to 3 days before the test. This depends on what kind of stool test you use. And do not do the test during your menstrual period or if you have active bleeding from hemorrhoids. If you aren't sure about how to prepare, ask your doctor.

    Do not use a stool sample for testing that has been in contact with toilet bowl cleaning products that turn the water blue.

  • During the test

    Stool analysis: Overview

    A stool analysis is a series of tests done on a stool (feces) sample to help diagnose certain conditions affecting the digestive tract. These conditions can include infection (such as from parasites, viruses, or bacteria), poor nutrient absorption, or cancer.

    For a stool analysis, a stool sample is collected in a clean container and then sent to the laboratory. Laboratory analysis includes microscopic examination, chemical tests, and microbiologic tests. The stool will be checked for color, consistency, amount, shape, odor, and the presence of mucus. The stool may be examined for hidden (occult) blood, fat, meat fibers, bile, white blood cells, and sugars called reducing substances. The pH of the stool also may be measured. A stool culture is done to find out if bacteria may be causing an infection.

  • Results

    What do the results of a stool analysis mean?

    Each lab has a different range for what’s normal. Your lab report should show the range that your lab uses for each test. The normal range is just a guide. Your doctor will also look at your results based on your age, health, and other factors. A value that isn’t in the normal range may still be normal for you.

    A stool analysis may check values for pH, reducing factors, and fat.

    Stool analysis test results usually take at least 1 to 3 days.

    Stool analysis

    Normal:

    The stool appears brown, soft, and well-formed in consistency.

    The stool does not contain blood, mucus, pus, undigested meat fibers, harmful bacteria, viruses, fungi, or parasites.

    The stool is shaped like a tube.

    Abnormal:

    The stool is black, red, white, yellow, or green.

    The stool is liquid or very hard.

    There is too much stool.

    The stool contains blood, mucus, pus, undigested meat fibers, harmful bacteria, viruses, fungi, or parasites.

    The stool contains low levels of enzymes, such as trypsin or elastase.

    Many conditions can change the results of a stool analysis. Your doctor will talk with you about any abnormal results that may be related to your symptoms and past health.

    Abnormal values

    • High levels of fat in the stool may be caused by diseases such as pancreatitis, sprue (celiac disease), cystic fibrosis, or other disorders that affect the absorption of fats.
    • The presence of undigested meat fibers in the stool may be caused by pancreatitis.
    • A low pH may be caused by poor absorption of carbohydrate or fat. Stool with a high pH may mean inflammation in the intestine (colitis), cancer, or antibiotic use.
    • Blood in the stool may be caused by bleeding in the digestive tract.
    • White blood cells in the stool may be caused by inflammation of the intestines, such as ulcerative colitis, or a bacterial infection.
    • Rotaviruses are a common cause of diarrhea in young children. If diarrhea is present, testing may be done to look for rotaviruses in the stool.
    • High levels of reducing factors in the stool may mean a problem digesting some sugars.
    • Low levels of reducing factors may be caused by sprue (celiac disease), cystic fibrosis, or malnutrition. Medicine such as colchicine (for gout) or birth control pills may also cause low levels.

    Copyrighted material adapted with permission from Healthwise, Incorporated. This information does not replace the advice of a doctor.