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UK urologists show the power of #ILookLikeASurgeon

Ten urologists peer over the operating table.
Blog

/ by UK HealthCare

Surgery, like many other professions, is a male-dominated field. In fact, only about 19 percent of all surgeons in the U.S. are women, according to the American Medical Association.

However, it's a different story in the urology department at UK.

"Women comprise just 8 percent of practicing urologists and about 25 percent of urology residents in the U.S.," said Dr. Amanda Saltzman, a pediatric urologist. "In fact, there are fewer women in urology than any other specialty in medicine, only about 1000 in the entire country. Here at UK, we have four out of 12 clinical faculty and six out of 14 residents who are female and one additional research faculty. This is substantially better than national rates, and I am so proud to work somewhere that actively embraces this kind of diversity!"

In celebration of their inclusive staff, the four female clinical faculty members and six female residents replicated the famous New Yorker magazine cover from April 3, 2017, where four female surgeons in full gowns and masks are looking down at the operating table. This cover inspired many female surgeons across the U.S. to create their own version of the illustration.

"It is important that all women, especially young women and girls, realize that they can do absolutely anything they want," said Saltzman. "To me, that is the root of the #ILookLikeASurgeon (or #ILookLikeAUrologist) movement. There is nothing holding a woman back from doing anything that she dreams of. This is a sign of solidarity by female surgeons  giving strength to each other by standing together."  

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