• Patient education


  • Depression in pregnancy and postpartum

    • Do you feel sad more often than happy?
    • Do you often cry?
    • Do you have trouble getting out of bed or accomplishing daily tasks?
    • Do you feel more irritated than normal with your spouse, children, family and friends?
    • Do you often feel anxious?
    • Do you have thoughts of suicide?
    • Do you feel angry about being pregnant or having a new baby?

    Depression is the No. 1 complication of pregnancy. Please contact us if you are experiencing any of these symptoms. We WILL NOT judge you; we are here to help.

  • Nutrition in pregnancy

    • Moderation is key. Try to exercise three to four times weekly for 45-60 minutes each time. This will help you balance your caloric consumption and physical well-being.
    • Eat six small meals a day.
    • Eat at least 60 grams of protein per day with a goal of 10 grams each for six small meals.
    • Reduce simple carb intake such as cookies, candies and cakes. Avoid excessive eating of pasta, rice and potatoes.
    • Increase intake vegetables.
    • Increase intake of fresh fruit instead of excessive fruit juice.
    • Drink mostly water and limit soda intake as well as sugary drinks. Aim for at least 80-90 ounces of water a day.
    • Limit caffeine intake to one to two servings a day.
    • It’s okay to eat seafood, but avoid fish with high mercury content such as mahi mahi, mackerel, shark and tile fish. It is okay to eat tuna and salmon.
    • Until 20 weeks of pregnancy, avoid cold lunch meat because of the possible contamination with listeria bacteria. You can heat meat in microwave, heat on a griddle or process it through a toaster oven.
  • VBAC (Vaginal Birth After Cesarean)

    • You must have routine office prenatal care.
    • Delivery by 41 weeks.
    • U.S. fetal weight estimate of less than 8 to 14 ounces.
    • History of no more than one previous low transverse C-section documented.
    • You must have a favorable cervix.
    • Cautions augmentation with Pitocin, amniotomy and intracervical catheter.
    • Cautions induction with Pitocin and amniotomy.
    • History of previous C-section more than 12 months prior.
    • Approval by backup physician Dr. Fadel Shammout.

    VBAC risks

    • Include the same risks as a normal vaginal delivery.
    • Uterine rupture, or tear in the uterus (0.4 percent-1.2 percent)
    • There may not be sufficient time to operate and prevent death of or permanent injury to baby.

    Repeat cesarean delivery risks

    • Need for blood transfusion.
    • Hysterectomy (removal of uterus).
    • Infection.
    • Blood clots.
    • Damage to the bladder, bowels and uterus.
    • Problems related to anesthesia.
    • Maternal death.
    • Fetal brain damage (approximately 1:1,000 TOLAC (trial of labor after cesarean) attempts).
    • Fetal death (6 percent of uterine ruptures).

    VBAC benefits

    • Our success rate is 80 percent.
    • 73.3 percent for one previous C-section.
    • 71.1 percent for two pervious C-sections.
    • Lower morbidity than repeat cesarean delivery.
    • Fewer blood transfusions.
    • Fewer infections.
    • Greater psychological satisfactions.
    • Shorter hospital stay.
    • Greater chance of vaginal delivery in the future.
    • Fewer breathing problems for the baby.