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Genetic counseling

A key component of Markey Cancer Center's mission to provide advanced patient care and leading-edge research is the Genetic Counseling Program. The program provides risk assessment for individuals with a strong family history of cancer. Individuals who are predisposed to cancer can review clinical management options for themselves and potentially at-risk family members.

Our genetic counselor provides patients with a personalized assessment of hereditary cancer risks and discusses cancer detection and risk reduction options. Patients' concerns are addressed with sensitivity and support. Genetic testing is offered when appropriate and the patient is returned to the referring physician for any necessary follow-up care.

To refer a patient for cancer genetics evaluation, call 859-323-2222. A fax referral form is available (PDF, 299 KB). 

For clinical questions, contact UK•MDs at 1-800-888-5533 

Please read the information below about referral guidelines for cancer genetics evaluation. You can also download the referral guidelines (PDF, 65 KB).

Referral guidelines for cancer genetics evaluation

Hereditary breast-ovarian cancer syndrome - Patient or first-degree relative with ANY of the following:

  • Breast or ovarian cancer and two or more first- or second-degree relatives (related through a single lineage) with breast or ovarian cancer.
  • Breast or ovarian cancer and one or more relatives with breast cancer diagnosed at an early age (younger than 50) or ovarian cancer diagnosed at any age.
  • Breast or ovarian cancer diagnosed at an early age (younger than 50).
  • Male breast cancer at any age.
  • Documented mutations in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene.
  • Ashkenazi Jewish descent with breast or ovarian cancer.
  • Suspicion of a genetic disorder/syndrome associated with increased risk of breast cancer.

Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal Cancer Syndrome (HNPCC) - Patient or first-degree relative with ANY of the following:

  • Two or more HNPCC-associated cancers (colorectum, endometrium, small bowel, ureter, renal pelvis) in the same individual.
  • Colorectal cancer with a first-degree relative with an HNPCC-associated cancer or colorectal adenoma; one of the cancers diagnosed at younger than 50 years; adenoma diagnosed at younger than 40 years.
  • Colorectal or endometrial cancer diagnosed at younger than 45 years.
  • Right-sided colon cancer with an undifferentiated pattern diagnosed younger than 50 years.
  • Signet ring cell type colorectal cancer diagnosed at younger than 50 years.
  • Adenomas diagnosed at younger than 40 years.
  • Documented mutation in an HNPCC-associated gene (MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, PMS2, and EPCAM).

Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP) 

  • Patient with more than 20 adenomatous colorectal polyps.
  • Patient or family member with a clinical diagnosis of FAP.
  • Patient or family member with a documented mutation in the APC or MYH gene.

Suspicion of a genetic condition associated with increased risk of malignancy: 

  • Personal history of cancer, and one or more relatives with the same type of cancer, one of the cancers diagnosed at younger than 50 years.
  • Personal history of two or more primary cancers, particularly if one of the diagnoses occurred at younger than 50 years, with or without family history of cancer.
  • Family history of cancer suggestive of a known syndrome (e.g. breast/thyroid:Cowden, breast/sarcoma:Li-Fraumeni).
Page last updated: 7/8/2014 4:49:43 PM