Bookmark and Share

Motor and sensory abnormalities

The specific neurological abnormalities that a person with a brain tumor experiences vary from person to person and depend on where in the brain the tumor is located. For example, if the tumor invades the motor regions of the brain (areas responsible for movement of the skeletal muscles, such as those in the arms and legs), patients can show signs of motor weakness on the opposite side of the body (one side of the brain controls the opposite side of the body). The arms and legs on the opposite side of the body may be stiff or move awkwardly.

When the areas of the brain responsible for sensing the environment - the sensory structures - are damaged, a person may feel tingling, numbness or other odd sensations.

People may not be able to recognize parts of their environment. For example, if the tumor obstructs the visual pathways, in addition to vision loss, patients may not be able to recognize objects by looking at them. If the tumor is in the temporal lobe of the brain, a person may see hallucinations or experience other unusual perceptions. If the tumor is in the frontal lobe, a patient may have bowel and bladder problems.

Page last updated: 6/20/2014 11:03:19 AM