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What is your barn aisle floor made of?

Published 01-26-2012 9:57 AM | Fernanda Camargo

We all love to spend time at the barn with our horses! That horse smell is unbeatable!

Each barn is constructed differently, although not all of them are safe for the horses or people! But aside from that, let's talk about the barn aisle flooring.

There are different materials for you to choose from, each one with pros and cons. So take a look at the list and let me know what you think and what your aisle is made of. Please include the pros and cons that you have personally found.

1. Dirt: this is inexpensive, it is the natural ground that your barn will be built upon. It is quiet, and horses don't generally slip on dirt. The disadvantages are: dusty, becomes uneven with time which means people and horses can easily trip, horses can dig holes, and you can't clean/disinfect. Good flooring if you don't plan to have a commercial facility with lots of horses and people.

2. Sand: this is not a suitable flooring for your barn aisle. Although it is comfortable for horses to walk on, sand will slip away through the cracks. It can be dusty and will need a lot of maintenance to keep it level.

3. Gravel: it is not very expensive, provides good traction for horses, but it may be hard on their hooves. If the gravel is too big, it will be uncomfortable to walk on, both for horses and people. If it is too small, it can get lodged between the hoof and the shoe and cause problems. It provides good drainage, and it may be a temporary flooring if you plan to put something else over it in the near future.

4. Wood chips: not very expensive, but it can be a fire hazard. This is more common in training barns than in any other type of barns, where the stalls are in the middle of the barn and the aisle way is all the way around on the perimeter of the barn. This is because the aisle way is used to warm down the horses, or even to ride on days that the weather does not permit outside riding.

I will include other materials in the next blog!

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Page last updated: 8/1/2013 9:07:47 AM