Diseases and Conditions

Short Height in Children

Some children grow more slowly than others. Height in the low normal range is still normal, doctors say.

Sleep and Your Child

Without enough shut-eye, children are more likely to struggle with their school studies, do poorly on the playing field, and suffer depression.

Smoking and Asthma

Did you know that smoking cigarettes can make your asthma worse?

Smoking Hurts Your Back

Smoking damages your arteries, and it’s thought that the damaged arteries in the discs and joints in your back may lead to pain and injury.

Special Caution on Concussions

Concussions affect many athletes, but these sports injuries are the least understood.

Special Foot Care for Diabetes

It's not high blood sugar, heart disease, or stroke that most often puts people with diabetes in the hospital. It's their feet.

Strength Training and Heart Disease

If you think that you can’t begin a strength-training program because you have heart disease, think again.

Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS)

SIDS stands for sudden infant death syndrome. It is a leading cause of infant death in the U.S. The causes of SIDS are unknown, but researchers have learned more about factors that can put your baby at risk. Learn which ones parents can prevent.

Take Action to Beat Heart Disease

Even if you already have atherosclerosis or have had a heart attack, there’s a lot you can do to prevent future heart problems.

Take Care With Nasal Sprays

A medicated nasal decongestant spray may offer fast relief when your nose is congested and running. It can reduce swelling and clear mucus from your nasal passages quickly.

Teens and Prescription Drugs

Many young people take prescription drugs because they believe they are safer than street drugs, but they can be just as dangerous if taken improperly.

The Cluster Headache: Just Like Clockwork

Cluster headaches -- called "cluster" because of their pattern of striking in groups or clusters -- hit at the same time of day for a period of weeks or months, then vanish as suddenly and as mysteriously as they appeared.

The Lowdown on Low Blood Pressure

Doctors often consider chronically low blood pressure too low only if it drops suddenly or causes noticeable symptoms.

The Metabolic Syndrome: At Risk for Depression

People with more visceral fat or an apple-shaped body—two factors associated with the metabolic syndrome—are more likely to have depression.

The 'Soft Teeth' Myth

Children who inherit the family trait of cavities don’t have “soft teeth,” as many people suspect. Instead, a mother’s dental history may be to blame. But with the right habits, you can help prevent cavities in your little one.

The Truth About Triglycerides

Triglycerides are the most common type of fat in your body. Most of your body's fat is stored as triglycerides.

Thriving After a Heart Attack

Over the long term, your quality of life is tied to how severe your heart attack was and how it was treated. Beyond that, any change will depend largely on you.

Thyroid Gland

Detailed information on the thyroid gland, including anatomy and function

Tinea Infections (Ringworm)

Detailed information on the most common types of ringworm, including diagnosis and treatment

Tinnitus: Stopping the Sound in Your Head

Tonsillectomy and Adenoidectomy in Children

A tonsillectomy may be recommended if your child has throat infections that keep coming back. Adenoidectomy is recommended if your child has a lot of trouble breathing through the nose. Often the tonsils and adenoids are removed at the same time.


Tonsillitis means that your tonsils are inflamed. Your tonsils are large, fleshy glands at the back of your throat. These glands make antibodies that help fight infection.

Tracking Symptoms of Heart Failure

If you have congestive heart failure, knowing your body can help you manage your condition.

Traveling with Asthma

Whether you pack a suitcase every week or once a year, you probably know that traveling takes a little extra preparation when you have asthma.

Twelve Weeks to a Heart-Healthy Lifestyle

Heart disease is a killer, but you can do plenty to reduce your risk and prolong your life. Research shows that making lifestyle changes can decrease your risk of cardiovascular heart disease and help you control it if you already have it.

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